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IS RIBBON FATIGUE RESULTING IN WRONG MESSAGE?; MAYBE THERE’S TOO MUCH PUBLICITY ABOUT BREAST CANCER, SAYS WOMEN’S EDITOR ROS D ODD.(Abstract Only)

ABSTRACT ONLY

Title: IS RIBBON FATIGUE RESULTING IN WRONG MESSAGE?;
MAYBE THERE’S TOO MUCH PUBLICITY ABOUT BREAST CANCER, SAYS WOMEN’S EDITOR ROS D ODD.

Author: Ros D. Odd

Publication: Birmingham Post

Publication Date: October 7, 1998

Little more than a few years ago, breast cancer was one of those diseases women talked about only among themselves, and even then in slightly hushed tones.

A lot of men turned squeamish when confronted with the illness; some, it has to be said, still do. Today, however, few people recoil from discussing this potentially fatal illness.

As women’s health issues in general have gained a higher profile, so breast cancer is being tackled head on, not only in the medical world but also at street level.

Each year now, October is designated Breast Cancer Awareness Month, generating a plethora of fund-raising and media events in a bid to raise public awareness of the disease.

Despite men’s growing understanding of breast cancer, most of the campaigning is, naturally, aimed at women. For although men can fall victim to the disease, the vast majority of sufferers are female.

One of the main objectives of Breast Cancer Awareness Month is to instill into women the importance of regularly examining themselves. For the earlier a cancerous lump is detected, the better chance they stand of being treated successfully.

The drive seems to be working. Women in their thousands now keep a pink ribbon pinned to the lapel of their coats and jackets, not only in October but throughout the year.

However, a recent survey showed that although 90 per cent of women know the importance of checking their breasts once a month, only nine per cent are doing a proper selxamination.

The implication is that, despite the steady rise in the amount of publicity given to breast cancer and its prevention, more needs to be done to alert people to the dangers of a disease which will affect one in 12 women at some point in their lives.

And yet perhaps – just perhaps – there is a little too much publicity; maybe pink ribbon-fatigue has set in and the life-saving messages being pumped out with such dedication are being ignored.

ABSTRACT ONLY

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